Annonce

Réduire
Aucune annonce.

Les 95 règles de la guerre cybernétique - Manuel de Tallinn

Réduire
X
 
  • Filtre
  • Heure
  • Afficher
Tout nettoyer
nouveaux messages

  • News Les 95 règles de la guerre cybernétique - Manuel de Tallinn

    Les 95 règles de la guerre cybernétique - Manuel de Tallinn
    La version originale :

    1. A State may exercise control over cyber infrastructure and activities within its sovereign territory.
    2. Without prejudice to applicable international obligations, a State may exercise it jurisdiction: over persons engaged in cyber activities on its territory; over cyber infrastructure located on its territory; and extraterritorially, in accordance with international law.
    3. Cyber infrastructure located on aircraft, ships, or other platforms in international airspace, on the high seas, or in outer space is subject to the jurisdiction of the flag State or State of registration.
    4. Any interference by a State with cyber infrastructure aboard a platform, wherever located, that enjoys sovereign immunity constitutes a violation of sovereignty.
    5. A State shall not knowingly allow the cyber infrastructure located in its territory or under its exclusive governmental control to be used for acts that adversely and unlawfully affect other States.
    6. A State bears international legal responsibility for a cyber operation attributable to it and which constitutes a breach of an international obligation.
    7. The mere fact that a cyber operation has been launched or otherwise originates from governmental cyber infrastructure is not sufficient evidence for attributing the operation to that State, but is an indication that the State in question is associated with the operation.
    8. The fact that a cyber operation has been routed via the cyber infrastructure located in a State is not sufficient evidence for attributing the operation to that State.
    9. A State injered by an internationally wrongful act may resort to proportionate countermeasures, including cyber countermeasures against the responsible State.
    10. A cyber operation that constitutes a threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or that is in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations, is unlawful.
    11. A cyber operation constitutes a use of force when its scale and effects are comparable to non-cyber operations rising to the level of a use of force.
    12. A cyber operation, or threatened cyber operation, constitutes an unlawful threat of force when the threatened action, if carried out, would be an unlawful use of force.
    13. A State that is the target of a cyber operation that rises to the level of an armed attack may exercise its inherent right of self-defence. Whether a cyber operation constitutes an armed attack depends on its scale and effects.
    14. A use of force involving cyber operations undertaken by a State in the exercise of its right of self-defence must be necessary and proportionate.
    15. The right to use force is self-defence arises if a cyber armed attack occurs or is imminent. It is further subject to a requirement of immediacy.
    16. The right of self-defence my be exercised collectively. Collective self-defence against a cyber operation amounting to an armed attack may only exercised at the request of the victim State and within the scope of the request.
    17. Measures involving cyber operations undertaken by States in the exercise of the right of self-defence pursuant to Article 51 of the United Nations Charter shall be immediately reported to the United Nations Security Council.
    18. Should the United Nations Security Council determine that an act constitutes a threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression it may authorize non-forceful measures, including cyber operations. If the Security Council considers such measures to be inadequate, it may decide upon forceful measures, including cyber measures.
    19. International organizations, arrangements, or agencies of a regional character may conduct enforcement actions, involving or in response to cyber operations, pursuant to a mandate from, or authorization by, the United Nations Security Council.
    20. Cyber operations executed in the context of an armed conflict are subject to the law of armed conflict.
    21. Cyber operations are subject to geographical limitations imposed by the relevant provisions of international law applicable during an armed conflict.
    22. An international armed conflict exists whenever there are hostilities, which may include or be limited to cyber operations, occurring between two or more States.
    23. A non-international armed conflict exists whenever there is protracted armed violence, which may include or be limited to cyber operations, occurring between governmental armed forces and the forces of one or more armed groups, or between such groups. The confrontation must reach a minimum level of intensity and the parties involved in the conflict must show a minimum degree of organisation.
    24. a) Commanders and other superiors are criminally responsible for ordering cyber operations that constitute war crimes
      b) Commanders are also criminally responsible if they knew or, owing to the circumstances at the time, show have known their subordinates were committing, were about to commit, or had committed war crimes and failed to take al reasonable and available measures to prevent their commission or to punish those responsible.
    25. The law of armed conflict does not bar any category of person from participating in cyber operations. However, the legal consequences of participation differ, based on the nature of the armed conflict and the category to which an individual belongs.
    26. In an international armed conflict, members of the armed forces of a party to the conflict who, in the course of cyber operations, fail to comply with the requirements of combatant status lose their entitlement to combatant immunity and prisoner of war status.
    27. In an international armed conflict, inhabitants of unoccupied territory who engage in cyber operations as part of a levée en masse enjoy combatant immunity and prisoner of war status.
    28. Mercenaries involved in cyber operations do not enjoy combatant immunity or prisoner of war status.
    29. Civilians are not prohibited from directly participating in cyber operations amounting to hostilities, but forfeit their protection from attacks for such time as the so participate.
    30. A cyber attack is a cyber operation, whether offensive or defensive, that is reasonably expected to cause injury or death to persons or damage or destruction to objects.
    31. The principle of distinction applies to cyber attacks.
    32. The civilian population as such, as well as individual civilians, shall not be the object of cyber attack.
    33. In case of doubt as to whether a person is a civilian, that person shall be considered to be a civilian.
    34. The following persons may be made the object of cyber attacks:
      a) members of the armed forces;
      b) members of organised armed groups;
      c) civilians taking a direct part in hostilities; and
      d) in an international armed conflict, participants in a levée en masse.
    35. Civilians enjoy protection against attack unless and for such time as they directly participate in hostilities.
    36. Cyber attacks, or the threat thereof, the primary purpose of which is to spread terror among the civilian population, are prohibited.
    37. Civilian objects shall not be made the object of cyber attacks. Computers, computer networks, and cyber infrastructure may be made the object of attack if they are minitary objectives.
    38. Civilian objects are all objects that are not military objectives. Military objectives are those objects which by their nature, location, purpose, or use, make an effective contribution to military action and whose total or partial destruction, capture or neutralisation, in the circumstances ruling at the time, offers a definite military advantage. Military objectives may include computers, computer networks, and cyber infrastructure.
    39. An object used for both civilian and military purposes – including computers, computer networks, and cyber infrastructure – is a military objective.
    40. In case of doubt as to whether an object that is normally dedicated to civilian purposes is being used to make an effective contribution to military action, a determination that it is so being used may only be made following a careful assessment.
    41. For the purposes of this Manual:
      a) ‘means of cyber warfare’ are cuber weapons and their associated cyber systems and
      b) ‘methods of cyber warfare’ are the cyber tactics, techniques, and procedures by which hostilities are conducted.
    42. It is prohibited to employ means or methods of cyber warfare that are of a nature to cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering.
    43. It is prohibited to employ means or methods of cyber warfare that are indiscriminate by nature. Means or methods cyber warfare are indiscriminate by nature when they cannot be:
      a) directed at a specific military objective, or
      b) limited in their effects are required by the lar of armed conflict
      and consequently are of a nature to strike military objectives and civilians or civilian objects without distinction.
    44. It is forbidden to employ cyber booby traps associated with certain objects specified in the law of armed conflict.
    45. Starvation of civilians as a method of cyber warfare is prohibited.
    46. Belligerent reprisals by way of cyber operations against:
      a) prisoners or war;
      b) interned civilians, civilians in occupied territory or otherwise in the hands of an adverse party to the conflict, and their property;
      c) those hors de combat; and
      d) medical personnel, facilities, vehicles and equipment are prohibited.
      Where not prohibited by international law, belligerent reprisals are subject to stringent conditions.
    47. Additional Protocol I prohibits States Parties from making the civilian population, individual civilians, civilian objects, cultural objects and places of worship, objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, the nature environment, and dams, dykes, and nuclear electrical generating stations the object of a cyber attack by way of reprisal.
    48. a) All States are required to ensure that the cyber means of warfare that they acquire or use comply with the rules of the law of armed conflict that bind the State.
      b) States that are Party to Additional Protocol I are required in the study, development, acquisition, or adoption of a new means or method of cyber warfare to determine whether its employment would, in some or all circumstances, be prohibited by that Protocol or by any other rule of international law applicable to that State.
    49. Cyber attacks that are not directed at a lawful target, and consequently are of a nature to strike lawful targets and civilians or civilian objects without distinction, are prohibited.
    50. A cyber attack that treats as a single target a number of clearly discrete cyber military objectives in cyber infrastructure primarily used for civilian purposes is prohibited if to do so would harm protected persons or objects.
    51. A cyber attack that may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated is prohibited.
    52. During hostilities involving cyber operations, constant care shall be taken to spare the civilian population, individual civilians, and civilian objects.
    53. Those who plan or decide upon a cyber attack shall do everything feasible to verify that the objectives to be attacked are neither civilians nor civilian objects and are not subject to special protection.
    54. Those who plan or decide upon a cyber attack shall take all feasible precautions in the choice of means or methods of warfare employed in such an attack, with a view to avoiding, and in any to minimising, incidental injury to civilians, loss of civilian life, and damage to or destruction of civilian objects.
    55. Those who plan or decide upon attacks shall refrain from deciding to launch any cyber attack that may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.
    56. For States Party to Additional Protocol I, when a choice is possible between several military objectives for obtaining a similar military advantage, the objective to be selected for cyber attack shall be that the attack on which may be expected to cause the least danger to civilian lives and to civilian objects.
    57. Those who plan, approve, or execute a cyber attack shall cancel or suspend the attack if it becomes apparent that:
      a) the objective is not a military one or is subject to special protection; or
      the attack may be expected to cause, directly or indirectly, incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof that would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.
    58. Effective advance warning shall be given of cyber attacks that may affect the civilian population unless circumstances do not permit.
    59. The parties to an armed conflict shall, to the maximum extent feasible, take necessary precautions to protect the civilian population, individual civilians, and civilian objects under their control against the dangers resulting from cyber attacks.
    60. In the conduct of hostilities involving cyber operations, it is prohibited to kill or injure and adversary by resort to perfidy. Acts that invite the confidence of an adversary to lead him to believe he or she is entitled to receive, or is obliged to accord, protection under the law of armed conflict with intent to betray that confidence constitute perfidy.
    61. Cyber operations that qualify as ruses of war are permitted.
    62. It is prohibited to make improper use of the protective emblems, signs, or signals that are set forth in the law of armed conflict.
    63. It is prohibited to make use of the distinctive emblem of the United Nations in cyber operations, except as authorised by that organisation.
    64. it is prohibited to make use of the flags, military emblems, insignia, or uniforms of the enemy while visible to the enemy during an attack including a cyber attack.
    65. In cyber operations, it is prohibited to make use of flags, military emblems, insignia, or uniforms of neutral or other States not party to the conflict.
    66. a) Cyber espionage and other forms of information gathering directed at an adversary during an armed conflict do not violate the law of armed conflict.
      b) A member of the armed forces who has engaged in cyber espionage in enemy-controlled territory loses the right to be a prisoner of war and may be treated as a spy if captured before re-joining the armed forces to which he or she belongs.
    67. Cyber methods and means of warfare may be used to maintain and enforce a naval or aerial blockade provided that they do not, alone or in combination with other methods, result in acts inconsistent with the law of international armed conflict.
    68. The use of cyber operations to enforce a naval or aerial blockade must not have the effect of barring, or otherwise seriously affective, access to neutral territory.
    69. To the extent that States establish zones, whether in peacetime or during armed conflict, lawful cyber operations may be used to exercise their rights in such zones.
    70. Medical and religious personnel, medical units, and medical transports must be respected and protected and, in particular, may not be made the object of cyber attack.
    71. Computers, computer networks, and data that form an integral part of the operations or administration of medical units and transports must be respected and protected, and in particular may not be made the object of attack.
    72. All feasible measures shall be tken to ensure that computers, computer networks, and data that form an integral part of the operations or administration of medical units and transports are clearly identified through appropriate means, including electronic markings. Failure to so identify them does not deprive them of their protected status.
    73. The protection to which medical units and transports, including computers computer networks, and data that form an integral prt of their operations or administration, are entitled by virtue of this section does not cease unless they are used to commit, outside their humanitarian function, acts harmful to the enemy. In such situations protection may cease only after a warning setting a reasonable time limit for compliance, when appropriate, remains unheeded.
    74. a) As long as they are entitled to the protection given to civilians and civilian objects under the law of armed conflict, United Nations personnel, installations, materiel, units and vehicles, including computers and computer networks that support United Nations operations, must be respected and protected and are not subject to cyber attack.
      b) Other personnel, installations, materiel, units, or vehicles, including computers and computer networks, involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the United Nations Charter are protected against cyber attack under the same conditions.
    75. Prisoners of war interned protected persons, and other detained persons must be protected from the harmful effects of cyber operations.
    76. The right of prisoners of war, interned protected persons, and other detained persons to certain correspondence must not be interfered with by cyber operations.
    77. Prisoners of war and interned protected persons shall not be compelled to participate in or support cyber operations directed against their own country.
    78. It is prohibited to conscript or enlist children into the armed forces or to allow them to take part in cyber hostilities.
    79. Civilian journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict are civilians and shall be respected as such, in particular with regard to cyber attacks, as long as they are not taking a direct part in hostilities.
    80. In order to avoid the release of dangerous forces and consequent severe losses among the civilian population, particular care must be taken during cyber attacks against works and installations containing dangerous forces, namely dams, dykes, and nuclear electrical generating stations, as well as installations located in their vicinity.
    81. Attacking, destroying, removing, or rendering useless objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population by means of cyber operations is prohibited.
    82. The parties to an armed conflict must respect and protect cultural property that may be affected by cyber operations or that is located in cyberspace. In particular, they are prohibited from using digital cultural property for military purposes.
    83. a) The natural environment is a civilian object and as such enjoys general protection from cyber attacks and their effects.
      b) States Party to Additional Protocol I are prohibited from employing cyber methods or means of warfare which are intended, or may be expected, to cause widespread, long-term, and severe damage to the natural environment.
    84. Diplomatic archives and communications are protected from cyber operations at all times.
    85. Collective punishment by cyber means is prohibited.
    86. Cyber operations shall not be designed or conducted to interfere unduly with impartial efforts to provide humanitarian assistance.
    87. Protected persons in occupied territory must be respected and protected from the harmful effects of cyber operations.
    88. The Occupying Power shall take all the measures in its power to restore and ensure, as far as possible, public order and safety, while respecting, unless absolutely prevented, the laws in force in the country, including the laws applicable to cyber activities.
    89. The Occupying Power may take measures necessary to ensure its general security, including the integrity and reliability of its own cyber systems.
    90. To the extend the law of occupation permits the confiscation or requisition of property, taking control of cyber infrastructure or systems is likewise permitted.
    91. The exercise of belligerent rights by cyber means directed against neutral cyber infrastructure is prohibited.
    92. The exercise of belligerent rights by cyber means in neutral territory is prohibited.
    93. A neutral State may not knowingly allow the exercise of belligerent rights by the parties to the conflict from cyber infrastructure located in its territory or under its exclusive control.
    94. If a neutral State fails to terminate the exercise of belligerent rights on its territory, the aggrieved party to the conflict may take such steps, including by cyber operations, as are necessary to counter that conduct.
    95. A State may not rely upon the law of neutrality to justify conduct, including cyber operations, that would be incompatible with preventive or enforcement measures decided upon by the Security Council under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations.

    La version traduit par Google translate :


    1. Un État peut exercer un contrôle sur l'infrastructure de cyber et les activités au sein de son territoire souverain.
    2. Sans préjudice des obligations internationales applicables, un État peut exercer la compétence: sur les personnes engagées dans des activités de cyber sur son territoire; sur une infrastructure cyber situé sur son territoire; et extraterritoriale, conformément au droit international.
    3. Infrastructure Cyber ​​situé sur les avions, les navires, ou d'autres plates-formes dans l'espace aérien international, en haute mer ou dans l'espace est soumis à la juridiction de l'État du pavillon ou de l'État d'immatriculation.
    4. Toute ingérence d'un État à l'infrastructure de cyber à bord d'une plate-forme, où qu'ils se trouvent, qui jouit de l'immunité souveraine constitue une violation de la souveraineté.
    5. Un État ne doit pas permettre sciemment l'infrastructure de cyber située sur son territoire ou sous son contrôle gouvernemental exclusif à être utilisé pour des actes qui défavorablement et illégalement affectent d'autres États.
    6. Un État assume la responsabilité juridique internationale pour une opération de cyber imputable et qui constitue une violation d'une obligation internationale.
    7. Le simple fait qu'une opération de cyber a été lancée ou autrement provient de l'infrastructure de cyber gouvernementale n’est pas des preuves suffisantes pour attribuer l'opération à cet État, mais est une indication que l'Etat en question est associé à l'opération.
    8. Le fait qu'une opération de cyber a été acheminée via l'infrastructure de cyber situé dans un État n’est pas des preuves suffisantes pour attribuer l'opération à cet État.
    9. Un État compromis par un fait internationalement illicite peut recourir à des contre-mesures proportionnées, y compris les cyber-contre-mesures contre l'État responsable.
    10. Une opération de cyber qui constitue une menace ou l'emploi de la force contre l'intégrité territoriale ou l'indépendance politique de tout Etat, ou qui est de toute autre manière incompatible avec les buts des Nations Unies, est illégale.
    11. Une opération de cyber constitue un recours à la force quand son ampleur et les effets sont comparables à des opérations non cyber hausse au niveau d'un recours à la force.
    12. Une opération de cyber, ou opération de cyber menacé, constitue une menace illégale de la force lorsque l'action menacée, si elle est réalisée, serait une utilisation illégale de la force.
    13. Un État qui est la cible d'une opération de cyber qui monte au niveau d'une attaque armée peut exercer son droit naturel de légitime défense. Que ce soit une opération de cyber constitue une attaque armée dépend de son ampleur et des effets.
    14. Un recours à la force impliquant des opérations cyber entreprises par un État dans l'exercice de son droit de légitime défense doit être nécessaire et proportionnée.
    15. Le droit d'utiliser la force est légitime défense se pose si une attaque armée cyber se produit ou est imminente. Il est en outre soumis à une obligation d'immédiateté.
    16. Le droit de légitime défense mon être exercé collectivement. Auto-défense collective contre une opération de cyber équivalant à une attaque armée ne peut exercer à la demande de l'État victime et dans le cadre de la demande.
    17. Les mesures impliquant des opérations cybernétiques menées par les États dans l'exercice du droit de légitime défense, conformément à l'article 51 de la Charte des Nations Unies doit être immédiatement signalé au Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies.
    18. le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies devrait déterminer qu'un acte constitue une menace pour la paix, rupture de la paix ou d'acte d'agression, il peut autoriser des mesures non-énergiques, y compris les opérations informatiques. Si le Conseil de sécurité estime que ces mesures sont insuffisantes, il peut prendre des mesures énergiques, y compris les mesures de cyber.
    19. Les organisations internationales, arrangements ou organismes à caractère régional peuvent mener des actions de mise en application, impliquant ou en réponse à des opérations de cyber, conformément à un mandat ou une autorisation par le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies.
    20. opérations Cyber ​​exécutées dans le contexte d'un conflit armé sont soumis à la loi des conflits armés.
    21. opérations Cyber ​​sont soumis à des limitations géographiques imposées par les dispositions pertinentes du droit international applicable pendant un conflit armé.
    22. Un conflit armé international existe chaque fois qu'il ya des hostilités, ce qui peut inclure ou être limitées à des opérations de cyber, se produisant entre deux ou plusieurs États.
    23. Un conflit armé non international existe chaque fois qu'il ya conflit armé prolongé, ce qui peut inclure ou être limitée à des opérations de cyber, survenant entre les forces armées gouvernementales et les forces d'un ou plusieurs groupes armés, ou entre de tels groupes. La confrontation doit atteindre un niveau minimum d'intensité et les parties impliquées dans le conflit doivent montrer un degré minimum d'organisation.
    24. Les commandants et autres supérieurs hiérarchiques sont pénalement responsables pour commander les opérations de cyber qui constituent des crimes de guerre
    b) Les commandants sont également pénalement responsables si elles savaient ou, en raison des circonstances de l'époque, spectacle ont connu leurs subordonnés commettaient, étaient sur le point de commettre, ou des crimes de guerre avaient commis et a omis de prendre al mesures raisonnables et disponibles pour prévenir leur Commission ou pour punir les responsables.
    25. Le droit des conflits armés ne fait pas obstacle toute catégorie de personnes de participer à des opérations de cyber. Cependant, les conséquences juridiques de la participation diffèrent, en fonction de la nature du conflit armé et la catégorie à laquelle appartient un individu.
    26. Dans un conflit armé international, les membres des forces armées d'une partie au conflit qui, au cours des opérations de cyber, ne parviennent pas à se conformer aux exigences du statut de combattant perdent leur droit à l'immunité de combattant et statut de prisonnier de guerre.
    27. Dans un conflit armé international, les habitants du territoire non occupé qui se livrent à des opérations de cyber dans le cadre d'une levée en masse jouissent de l'immunité de combattant et statut de prisonnier de guerre.
    28. Mercenaires impliqués dans les opérations de cyber ne jouissent pas de l'immunité du combattant ou de statut de prisonnier de guerre.
    29. Les civils ne sont pas autorisés à participer directement à des opérations de cyber montant des hostilités, mais perdent leur protection contre les attaques pendant la durée de la sorte participé.
    30. Une cyber-attaque est une opération de cyber, que ce soit offensive ou défensive, qui est raisonnablement susceptible de causer des blessures ou la mort à des personnes ou des dommages ou la destruction d'objets.
    31. Le principe de distinction applique aux cyber-attaques.
    32. La population civile en tant que telle, ainsi que les personnes civiles ne doivent être l'objet de cyber attaque.
    33. En cas de doute quant à savoir si une personne est un civil, celui-ci doit être considéré comme un civil.
    34. Les personnes suivantes peuvent être l'objet de cyber-attaques:
    a) les membres des forces armées;
    b) les membres des groupes armés organisés;
    c) les civils qui participent directement aux hostilités; et
    d) dans un conflit armé international, les participants à une levée en masse.
    35. Les civils bénéficient d'une protection contre les attaques à moins et pour ce qu'ils participent directement aux hostilités.
    36. Les cyber-attaques, ou la menace de celle-ci, dont le but principal est de répandre la terreur parmi la population civile, sont interdits.
    37. Les biens civils ne doivent pas être l'objet de cyber-attaques. Ordinateurs, réseaux informatiques et de l'infrastructure de cyber peuvent faire l'objet d'une attaque si elles sont des objectifs mineurs.
    38. objets civil tous les biens qui ne sont pas des objectifs militaires. Les objectifs militaires sont ces objets qui, par leur nature, l'emplacement, le but, ou l'utilisation, apportent une contribution effective à l'action militaire et dont la destruction totale ou partielle, la capture ou la neutralisation, en l'occurrence à l'époque, offre un avantage militaire précis. Les objectifs militaires peuvent inclure des ordinateurs, des réseaux informatiques et de l'infrastructure informatique.
    39. Un objet utilisé à des fins civiles et militaires - y compris les ordinateurs, les réseaux informatiques et l'infrastructure de cyber - est un objectif militaire.
    40. En cas de doute quant à savoir si un objet qui est normalement affecté à des fins civiles est utilisé pour apporter une contribution effective à l'action militaire, une détermination qu'il est donc utilisé peut seulement être faite suite à une évaluation minutieuse.
    41. Aux fins de ce manuel:
    a) «moyens de guerre cybernétique» sont des armes cuber et leurs systèmes informatiques associés et
    b) «méthodes de cyber guerre» sont les tactiques de cyber, les techniques et les procédures par lesquelles les hostilités sont menées.
    42. Il est interdit d'employer des moyens ou méthodes de guerre cybernétique qui sont de nature à causer des blessures ou des souffrances inutiles.
    43. Il est interdit d'employer des moyens ou méthodes de guerre cybernétique qui sont aveugles par nature. Moyens ou méthodes cyber guerre sont aveugles par nature quand ils ne peuvent pas être:
    a) dirigée contre un objectif militaire spécifique, ou
    b) limitées dans leurs effets sont tenus par la loi des conflits armés
    et sont par conséquent de nature à frapper des objectifs militaires et des civils ou des biens civils sans distinction.
    44. Il est interdit d'employer des pièges cyber associés à certains objets spécifiés dans le droit des conflits armés.
    45. La famine des civils comme méthode de guerre cybernétique est interdite.
    46. ​​Les représailles par voie d'opérations informatiques contre:
    a) les prisonniers ou la guerre;
    b) internés civils, des civils en territoire occupé ou autrement dans les mains d'une partie adverse au conflit, et de leurs biens;
    c) les hors de combat; et
    d) le personnel médical, les installations, les véhicules et l'équipement sont interdits.
    Où ne sont pas interdites par le droit international, les représailles belligérantes sont soumises à des conditions strictes.
    47. Protocole additionnel I interdit aux États parties de faire de la population civile, les personnes civiles, des biens civils, des objets et des lieux de culte, des objets indispensables à la survie de la population civile, l'environnement de la nature, et les barrages, les digues, et la génération électrique nucléaire stations l'objet d'une cyber-attaque en représailles.
    48. Tous les États sont tenus de veiller à ce que signifie le cyber de la guerre qu'ils acquièrent ou utilisent conforme aux règles du droit des conflits armés qui lient l'État.
    b) Les États qui sont Parties au Protocole additionnel I sont nécessaires dans l'étude, le développement, l'acquisition ou l'adoption d'un nouveau moyen ou méthode de guerre cybernétique afin de déterminer si leur emploi serait, dans certains ou en toutes circonstances, être interdit par ce Protocole ou par toute autre règle du droit international applicable à cet État.
    49. Les cyber-attaques qui ne sont pas dirigées vers une cible légitime, et par conséquent sont de nature à frapper des cibles et des civils légitimes ou des biens civils sans distinction, sont interdits.
    50. Une cyber-attaque qui traite comme une cible unique un certain nombre de cyber objectifs militaires clairement discrets dans l'infrastructure cybernétique principalement utilisé à des fins civiles est interdite si à cela porterait atteinte à des personnes ou des objets protégés.
    51. Une cyber-attaque qui pourrait être susceptible de causer incidemment des pertes en vie civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ceux-ci, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l'avantage militaire concret et direct attendu est interdite.
    52. Au cours des hostilités impliquant des opérations cybernétiques, des soins constants doivent être prises pour épargner la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens civils.
    53. Ceux qui préparent ou décident une cyber-attaque doit faire tout possible pour vérifier que les objectifs à attaquer ne sont ni les civils, ni des biens civils et ne sont pas soumis à une protection spéciale.
    54. Ceux qui préparent ou décident une cyber-attaque doit prendre toutes les précautions possibles dans le choix des moyens ou méthodes de guerre employées dans une telle attaque, en vue d'éviter et, en tout pour réduire au minimum, accessoires blessures aux personnes civiles, la perte de la vie civile, et les dommages ou la destruction de biens civils.
    55. Ceux qui préparent ou décident attaques doivent s'abstenir de lancer une cyber-attaque qui pourrait être susceptible de causer incidemment des pertes en vie civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ceux-ci, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l'avantage militaire concret et direct attendu.
    56. Pour les Etats parties au Protocole additionnel I, lorsque le choix est possible entre plusieurs objectifs militaires pour obtenir un avantage militaire équivalent, l'objectif d'être sélectionné pour le cyber attaque est celui qui peut penser que l'attaque sur lequel le moins de danger pour la vie des civils et des objectifs civils.
    57. Ceux qui planifient, approuver ou exécuter une cyber-attaque doit annuler ou de suspendre l'attaque lorsqu'il apparaît que:
    a) l'objectif est pas un militaire ou est soumis à une protection spéciale; ou
    on peut attendre qu'elle cause, directement ou indirectement, la perte accidentelle de la vie civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ceux-ci qui serait excessif par rapport à l'avantage militaire concret et direct attendu.
    58. Préavis effectif doit être donné de cyber-attaques qui peuvent affecter la population civile, à moins que les circonstances ne le permettent pas.
    59. Les parties à un conflit armé doivent, dans la mesure du possible, prendre les précautions nécessaires pour protéger la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens civils sous leur contrôle contre les dangers résultant des cyber-attaques.
    60. Dans la conduite des hostilités impliquant des opérations cybernétiques, il est interdit de tuer ou blesser et adversaire en recourant à la perfidie. Actes qui invitent la confiance d'un adversaire pour le conduire à croire qu'il ou elle a le droit de recevoir, ou est obligé d'accorder la protection en vertu du droit des conflits armés avec l'intention de trahir cette confiance constitue la perfidie.
    61. opérations Cyber ​​qui se qualifient comme ruses de guerre sont autorisés.
    62. Il est interdit de faire un usage abusif des protecteurs des emblèmes, signes ou signaux qui sont énoncés dans le droit des conflits armés.
    63. Il est interdit de faire usage de l'emblème distinctif des Nations Unies dans les opérations cybernétiques, sauf autorisation par cette organisation.
    64. Il est interdit d'utiliser les drapeaux, emblèmes militaires, insignes ou uniformes de l'ennemi alors visible à l'ennemi lors d'une attaque, y compris une cyber-attaque.
    65. Dans les opérations de cyber, il est interdit de faire usage de drapeaux, emblèmes militaires, insignes ou uniformes d'Etats neutres ou autres ne sont pas parties au conflit.
    66. Cyber ​​espionnage et d'autres formes de collecte d'informations adressées à un adversaire lors d'un conflit armé ne violent pas le droit des conflits armés.
    b) Un membre des forces armées qui a engagés dans l'espionnage cybernétique sur le territoire contrôlé par l'ennemi perd le droit d'être un prisonnier de guerre et peut être traité comme un espion en cas de capture avant de rejoindre les forces armées à laquelle il ou elle appartient.
    67. méthodes et moyens de guerre cybernétique peuvent être utilisés pour maintenir et faire respecter un blocus naval ou aérien à condition qu'ils ne le fassent pas, seul ou en combinaison avec d'autres méthodes, entraîner à des actes incompatibles avec le droit des conflits armés internationaux.
    68. L'utilisation des opérations de cyber pour faire appliquer un blocus naval ou aérien ne doit pas avoir pour effet d'empêcher, ou autrement sérieux affectif, l'accès au territoire neutre.
    69. Dans la mesure où les États établissent des zones, que ce soit en temps de paix ou en temps de conflit armé, les cyber-opérations licites peuvent être utilisés pour exercer leurs droits dans ces zones.
    70. Le personnel médical et religieux, des unités médicales et les transports sanitaires doivent être respectés et protégés et, en particulier, ne peut pas être fait l'objet d'une cyber-attaque.
    71. Ordinateurs, réseaux informatiques et les données qui font partie intégrante des opérations ou de l'administration des unités et moyens de transport doivent être respectés et protégés, et en particulier ne peuvent pas faire l'objet d'une attaque.
    72. Toutes les mesures possibles doivent être tenues pour assurer que les ordinateurs, les réseaux informatiques et les données qui font partie intégrante des opérations ou de l'administration des unités et moyens de transport sont clairement identifiés par des moyens appropriés, y compris les marquages ​​électroniques. Le non afin de les identifier ne les prive pas de leur statut protégé.
    73. La protection due aux unités et moyens de transport sanitaires, y compris les réseaux d'ordinateurs, et les données qui forment une partie intégrante de leurs activités ou de l'administration, ont droit en vertu du présent article ne cesse pas, sauf si elles sont utilisées pour commettre, en dehors de leur fonction humanitaire, des actes nuisibles à l'ennemi. Dans de telles situations la protection ne cessera qu'après la mise en garde d'un délai raisonnable pour le respect, le cas échéant, reste lettre morte.
    74. Tant qu'ils ont droit à la protection accordée aux civils et aux biens de caractère civil dans le cadre du droit des conflits armés, le personnel des Nations Unies, les installations, le matériel, les unités et les véhicules, y compris les ordinateurs et les réseaux informatiques qui prennent en charge les opérations des Nations Unies, doivent être respectés et protégés et ne sont pas soumis à une attaque cybernétique.
    b) Autres personnel, les installations, le matériel, les unités ou les véhicules, y compris les ordinateurs et les réseaux informatiques, impliqués dans une aide humanitaire ou mission de paix conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies sont protégés contre les attaques cyber dans les mêmes conditions.
    75. Les prisonniers de guerre internés personnes protégées, et d'autres personnes détenues doivent être protégés contre les effets nocifs des opérations informatiques.
    76. Le droit des prisonniers de guerre, les personnes protégées internées, et d'autres personnes détenues à certaine correspondance ne doit pas être perturbée par des opérations de cyber.
    77. Les prisonniers de guerre et les personnes protégées internés ne seront pas astreints à participer ou à soutenir les opérations de cyber-dirigées contre leur propre pays.
    78. Il est interdit à la conscription ou l'enrôlement d'enfants dans les forces armées ou pour leur permettre de prendre part aux hostilités cybernétiques.
    79. Les journalistes civils qui accomplissent des missions professionnelles périlleuses dans des zones de conflit armé sont des civils et doivent être respectés en tant que tels, en particulier en ce qui concerne les cyber-attaques, tant qu'ils ne prennent pas une part directe aux hostilités.
    80. Afin d'éviter la libération de forces dangereuses et lourdes pertes conséquentes parmi la population civile, un soin particulier doit être pris lors de cyber-attaques contre les ouvrages et installations contenant des forces dangereuses, à savoir les barrages, les digues et les centrales électriques nucléaires, ainsi que installations situées dans leur voisinage.
    81. attaquer, de détruire, éliminer ou de rendre des objets indispensables à la survie de la population civile par le biais d'opérations de cyber est interdite.
    82. Les parties à un conflit armé doivent respecter et protéger les biens culturels qui peuvent être affectés par les opérations de cyber ou qui se trouve dans le cyberespace. En particulier, il leur est interdit d'utiliser les biens culturels numériques à des fins militaires.
    83. L'environnement naturel est un objet civil et en tant que tels bénéficient d'une protection générale contre les cyber attaques et leurs effets.
    b) les États parties au Protocole additionnel I est interdit d'employer des méthodes de cyber ou moyens de guerre qui sont destinés, ou peut être prévu, à provoquer, à long terme généralisée et de graves dommages à l'environnement naturel.
    84. archives et communications diplomatiques sont protégées contre les cyber-opérations à tout moment.
    85. La punition collective au moyen de cyber est interdite.
    86. Les opérations Cyber ​​ne doivent pas être conçus ou réalisés pour entraver indûment les efforts impartiaux pour fournir une assistance humanitaire.
    87. Les personnes protégées en territoire occupé doivent être respectés et protégés contre les effets nocifs des opérations informatiques.
    88. La Puissance occupante doit prendre toutes les mesures en son pouvoir pour rétablir et d'assurer, dans la mesure du possible, l'ordre et la sécurité publique, tout en respectant, sauf empêchement absolu, les lois en vigueur dans le pays, y compris les lois applicables aux activités de cyber.
    89. La Puissance occupante peut prendre les mesures nécessaires pour assurer sa sécurité générale, y compris l'intégrité et la fiabilité de ses propres systèmes informatiques.
    90. Pour l'extension du droit de l'occupation permet la confiscation ou réquisition de biens, de prendre le contrôle de l'infrastructure cybernétique ou des systèmes sont également autorisés.
    91. L'exercice des droits belligérants par cyber moyens dirigés contre l'infrastructure de cyber neutre est interdit.
    92. L'exercice des droits belligérants par cyber signifie en territoire neutre est interdite.
    93. Un Etat neutre ne peut sciemment permettre l'exercice des droits belligérants par les parties au conflit de l'infrastructure de cyber située sur son territoire ou sous son contrôle exclusif.
    94. Si un Etat neutre ne parvient pas à mettre fin à l'exercice des droits belligérants sur son territoire, la partie lésée au conflit peut prendre les mesures, y compris par des opérations de cyber, qui sont nécessaires pour contrer ce comportement.
    95. Un Etat ne peut invoquer la loi de neutralité pour justifier un comportement, y compris les opérations de cyber, qui serait incompatible avec les mesures préventives ou coercitives décidées par le Conseil de sécurité en vertu du Chapitre VII de la Charte des Nations Unies.

  • #2
    Merci beaucoup, j'en avais entendu parler, mais jamais eu l'occase de l'avoir sous les yeux
    @bioshock
    Twitter: @ContactBioshock
    Mail: [email protected]

    Commentaire


    • #3
      Envoyé par Bioshock Voir le message
      Merci beaucoup, j'en avais entendu solution crédit locataire
      parler, mais jamais eu l'occase de l'avoir sous les yeux
      Bonjour !
      C’est un sujet vraiment passionnant qui réveil toute ma curiosité et je ne m’en lasse pas même après l’avoir lu et relus.

      Commentaire

      Chargement...
      X